Is Skateboarding Hip-hop?


A new question I’m hit with often is “Is skateboarding a part of the hip hop culture?” To me, the immediate question is a NO. Skateboarding is not a part of the 4 original elements oh hip hop, which include –

1. Rapping 2. DJ’ing 3. Breakdancing 4. Graffiti

Hip hop has become a beacon at the forefront of both pop and r&b music. Film/TV and radio have been saturated with hip hop references. In car insurance and soft drink commercials, restaurants like Mcdonalds and Taco Bell have made a pretty penny off the backs of both mainstream and underground artists alike. But, who is really allowed to say what is and isn’t hip hop anymore. Hip hop is not only a style of music, but also a way of life. Hip hop is something that is better lived than experienced. The way you walk, talk and act, all the way down to the style of clothes you wear. This is what it means to practice hip hop!

In recent years, there has been a surge of new artists that seem to embrace the skateboard as an acceptable source of transportation within the hip hop community. Fans of all music can now be seen traveling from point A to point B on a skateboard in order to reach their destination.

I can recall a time where dreadlocks were a sign of intelligence, honor and respect for the culture. Nowadays, you can see the younger males wearing dreads that are dyed many colors from red to green, even purple and white. We can no longer approach someone with dreadlocks expecting to hear intelligence flow from their mouths. Now, dreads coincide with a drug addiction for Codeine, Promethazine, “Lean”, Xanax and other easy-to-obtain mediacations.

Back to skateboards. These same-hair dyed skaters can be seen all across the united states of America. Pay-as-you-Play radio stations have become the norm where you can hear the same song played in rotation in a matter of minutes. Thus, leaving no room for the aspiring artist that wants to attain a certain level of success.

On the other hand, Artists like Wiz Khalifa, Lil Wayne, ASAP Rocky, Machine Gun Kelly and Hopsin have made quite a name for themselves as pioneers of skateboarding within both Hip hop and Rap genres. There is an apparent lane for artists to acquire large sums of money while being able to enjoy the life of a skater.

Ultimately, who am I to say the skateboard is or is not an acceptable form of hip hop. It’s entirely up to this new generation on how long the skateboard will be around. I remember in-line skates as well as the roller blades at skating rinks and parks, which I no longer see. As I previously stated, I don’t claim skating as a true form of hip hop. I do, however, recognize the impact on our youth as well as the fact that we are now in a new age of music. Things that weren’t ok growing up, (like homosexuality) is now a major part of the world in which we live.

So, in closing, I would like to learn how to better embrace new avenues of imagery and fanaticism with hip hop. It is no longer up to me if we feel the skateboard should or shouldn’t be a part of hip hop. It’s up to you. As a fan of music, you are the one who has the power to change things. If you feel you would like us to acknowledge the skateboard as a true form of hip hop, then we support you. Just don’t expect to EVER see a member of GUANO on a skateboard doing heel flips and kicks.A new question I’m hit with often is “Is skateboarding a part of the hip hop culture?”

To me, the immediate question is a NO. Skateboarding is not a part of the 4 original elements oh hip hop, which include – 1. Rapping2. DJ’ing3. Breakdancing4. Graffiti Hip hop has become a beacon at the forefront of both pop and r&b music. Film/TV and radio have been saturated with hip hop references. In car insurance and soft drink commercials, restaurants like Mcdonalds and Taco Bell have made a pretty penny off the backs of both mainstream and underground artists alike. But, who is really allowed to say what is and isn’t hip hop anymore. Hip hop is not only a style of music, but also a way of life. Hip hop is something that is better lived than experienced. The way you walk, talk and act, all the way down to the style of clothes you wear. This is what it means to practice hip hop!

In recent years, there has been a surge of new artists that seem to embrace the skateboard as an acceptable source of transportation within the hip hop community. Fans of all music can now be seen traveling from point A to point B on a skateboard in order to reach their destination. I can recall a time where dreadlocks were a sign of intelligence, honor and respect for the culture. Nowadays, you can see the younger males wearing dreads that are dyed many colors from red to green, even purple and white. We can no longer approach someone with dreadlocks expecting to hear intelligence flow from their mouths. Now, dreads coincide with a drug addiction for Codeine, Promethazine, “Lean”, Xanax and other easy-to-obtain mediacations. Back to skateboards. These same-hair dyed skaters can be seen all across the united states of America. Pay-as-you-Play radio stations have become the norm where you can hear the same song played in rotation in a matter of minutes. Thus, leaving no room for the aspiring artist that wants to attain a certain level of success.

On the other hand, Artists like Wiz Khalifa, Lil Wayne, ASAP Rocky, Machine Gun Kelly and Hopsin have made quite a name for themselves as pioneers of skateboarding within both Hip hop and Rap genres. There is an apparent lane for artists to acquire large sums of money while being able to enjoy the life of a skater. Ultimately, who am I to say the skateboard is or is not an acceptable form of hip hop. It’s entirely up to this new generation on how long the skateboard will be around. I remember in-line skates as well as the roller blades at skating rinks and parks, which I no longer see. As I previously stated, I don’t claim skating as a true form of hip hop. I do, however, recognize the impact on our youth as well as the fact that we are now in a new age of music. Things that weren’t ok growing up, (like homosexuality) is now a major part of the world in which we live.

So, in closing, I would like to learn how to better embrace new avenues of imagery and fanaticism with hip hop. It is no longer up to me if we feel the skateboard should or shouldn’t be a part of hip hop. It’s up to you. As a fan of music, you are the one who has the power to change things. If you feel you would like us to acknowledge the skateboard as a true form of hip hop, then we support you. Just don’t expect to EVER see a member of GUANO on a skateboard doing heel flips and kicks.


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